Dr. Kevin Yip

Dr Kevin Yip
Orthopaedic Surgeon
MBBS(UK), FRCS(EDIN), FAM(SING), FHKCOS(ORTHO)

Featured on Channel NewsAsia

Casts & Plasters & Splints

Casts & Plasters & Splints

Casts & Plasters & Splints

Cast / Plaster is usually used to treat fracture with no dislocation or for soft tissue injury.

GENERAL INFORMATION

Splints and casts support and protect injured bones and soft tissue, reducing pain, swelling, and muscle spasm. In some cases, splints and casts are applied following surgery.

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Operative Treatment for Adhesive Capsulitis

Manipulation Under Anesthesia

Manipulation under anesthesia (MUA) has been used to treat adhesive capsulitis for many years. This treatment has commonly been described to prospective patients as “stretching the tight capsule” or “breaking up adhesions” within the shoulder joint. Arthroscopic visualization of the glenohumeral joint after this procedure, however, reveals that a MUA does not […]

Technique

Operative intervention for biceps pathology begins with arthroscopic inspection and debridement. The proximal biceps tendon is easily visualized during standard glenohumeral arthroscopy. The tendon is first visualized thoroughly from the posterior portal. The tendon should be inspected from its origin on the superior glenoid tubercle and/or superior labrum all the way into the bicipital sheath. […]

Biceps Instability

Biceps instability takes the form of either frank dislocation or more subtle subluxation. As noted previously, the primary restraining structures holding the LHB in the bicipital groove are the medial sling and subscapularis tendon. Habermayer and Walch divided LHB dislocations into extra-articular or intra-articular. The much less common extra-articular dislocations dislodge from the bicipital groove […]

Stiffness

Stiffness after surgery for open anterior instability is infrequently noted in literature and the incidence of this complication is probably under-reported. Certain repairs were designed to limit external rotation and hence the risk of recurrence, so loss of motion was not considered a complication.

In some settings (e.g., capsular reconstruction or revision surgery), limited external […]

Open Surgery

Open surgery for instability remains an acceptable method of treatment when the surgeon lacks the equipment, experience, or technical expertise to perform an arthroscopic repair. Furthermore, open surgery is indicated in situations where current arthroscopic methods are likely to fail—namely, in the setting of large bone or soft tissue deficiencies or in the context of […]

Principles of Instability Surgery

The goal of treatment in both open and arthroscopic instability surgery is twofold: to restore the labrum to its anatomic attachment site and to re-establish the appropriate tension to the inferior capsuloligamentous complex of the joint. Cadaveric studies have shown that both the labrum and the capsule must be injured for a dislocation to occur.

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Sprains and Strains

Although the terms sprain and strain are used loosely and have no precise clinical definition, a sprain generally refers to an injury to a ligament – one of the tough, fibrous cords within a joint that connects the bones together, and a strain refers to muscle injury.

Sprains and strains often occur together in or […]

Degree of Instability

The degree of instability (dislocation, subluxation, and microinstability) is also important in determining appropriate treatment options. Dislocation refers to complete dissociation of the articular surfaces of the humeral head and the glenoid cavity.

Subluxation describes increased humeral head translation within the glenoid cavity, where the humeral head translates to the edge of the glenoid […]

Etiology

Etiology can be subdivided into traumatic, microtraumatic, or atraumatic groups also includes congenital and neuromuscular causes. The atraumatic group includes patients who exhibit a voluntary component of their instability. In this classification, these patients can be further subdivided into group I: voluntary instability, which is arm-position dependent and usually posterior; and group II: voluntary instability […]