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Spinal Decompression Surgery & Slip Disc

Spinal Decompression Surgery in Singapore

Spinal Decompression Surgery in Singapore

Microdiscectomy Spine Surgery?

In a microdiscectomy or microdecompression spine surgery, a small portion of the bone over the nerve root and/or disc material from under the nerve root is removed to relieve neural impingement and provide more room for the nerve to heal.

A microdiscectomy is typically performed for a […]

Management-Operative Management

For axillary nerve injury resulting from penetrating trauma or iatrogenic causes, management is immediate repair. When axillary nerve injury results from causes other than penetrating trauma or surgery (i.e., those with closed trauma), surgery is indicated for symptomatic patients with no clinical or EMG/NCV evidence of recovery 3 to 6 months following injury.

The best […]

Management-Nonoperative Management

Nonoperative management of an axillary nerve injury includes reassurance, activity modification, symptomatic management, and physical therapy. As the nerve recovers, active, passive-, and active-assisted range of shoulder motion should be performed to maintain motion, and electrical stimulation and strengthening exercises may help to reduce atrophy of the deltoid.

The athlete should be reassured of nerve […]

Evaluation-Imaging

Several tests may be necessary to rule out other causes of shoulder pain, because isolated axillary nerve injury and quadrilateral space syndrome are rare. Plain radiographs typically are ordered, but these are useful in these cases only with a history of trauma that is consistent with a possible proximal humerus fracture, scapular neck fracture, or […]

Evaluation-Physical Examination

The physical examination of athletes with axillary nerve injury should include evaluation for range of motion (passive and active) as well as strength (abduction, forward elevation, external rotation, and internal rotation). Patients with a chronic history of the problem may demonstrate atrophy or asymmetry of the deltoid muscle mass.

A neurovascular examination should be performed […]

Biomechanics

The most common mechanism of injury to the axillary nerve is closed trauma involving a traction injury to the shoulder,such as stretching of the nerve over the humeral head during an anterior shoulder dislocation. The incidence of axillary nerve injury has been reported to be between 19% and 55% following an anterior shoulder dislocation and […]

Anatomy

The main function of the axillary nerve is to provide the motor supply to the deltoid. The axillary nerve originates from the spinal cord at the C5 and C6 levels, with occasional contribution from the C4 level. The nerve travels below the coracoid process, then obliquely along the anterior surface of the subscapularis.

Approximately 3 […]

Management-Techniques

The technique and approach of surgical decompression of the suprascapular nerve is dependent on the location of the presumed etiology of the nerve dysfunction. If the pathology is at the suprascapular notch, then the transverse scapular ligament and suprascapular notch may be approached anteriorly, superiorly, or posteriorly.

The anterior approach uses a saber-type incision, just […]

Managment-Operative Management

Surgical decision making is first dependent on whether a cyst is causing suprascapular nerve compression. If a ganglion cyst is present, then the cyst is a result of intra-articular pathology; in athletes, this frequently is because of a labral tear. The natural history of ganglion cysts about the shoulder is not known; however, it commonly […]

Management-Nonoperative Management

The initial management of suprascapular nerve injuries usually is nonoperative. Most authors have found that resolution of symptoms occurs within 6 to 12 months after diagnosis. This is particularly true if the patient has no evidence of a space-occupying lesion (cyst). Because most of these injuries in athletes are thought to be related to traction […]